Distracted Living

Distracted Living

Is a technology diet in order?


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That’s the gist of a Fortune piece Patricia Sellers. It’s a fun read, thought I’m not wild about the headline: “2010 Resolution: Slow Down for Success.” Does everything have to be about “success”? How about contentment, enjoying yourself, being happy?

In any case, she’s decided her New Year’s resolution isn’t about cramming more into her life. As she puts it: “Instead of resolving to do more this year, I’m aiming to do less. To slow down.”

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Distracted Living

Crime writer on info-overload


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At the Murderati blog, crime writer J.T. Ellison takes in the topic of information overload. The post includes some interesting thoughts/musings on the topic—in particular, how to control your info-consumption and also tackle creative projects:

Late last year I adopted a minimalist lifestyle, which included trying to have a more minimalist experience on the Internet. I just realized that in my quest to learn about minimalism, I ended up subscribed to 12 minimalism/productivity blogs, all of which basically repeat the same information over and over again. Not very minimalist. It was ridiculous, really. Anyone can talk the talk. It’s walking the walk that’s the hard part. There’s one blogger (who shall remain nameless) that I used to love. When I realized that he spent all his time talking about creativity, yet never creating, I deleted him from my feeds.

Distracted Living

Washington journalist without a BlackBerry? Yes, it makes sense


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I love this brief essay from The New Yorker’s George Packer about the “information hell” of Twitter. Yes, I use Twitter, but I’ve got serious reservations about it, and Packer captures this:

The truth is, I feel like yelling Stop quite a bit these days. Every time I hear about Twitter I want to yell Stop. The notion of sending and getting brief updates to and from dozens or thousands of people every few minutes is an image from information hell.

Distracted Living, Writing

Distracted living


You’ve heard of distracted driving. But what about distracted living? I coined the term (sort of) to apply to the condition of being distracted by the increasingly pervasive, and seemingly unavoidable, communications technologies surrounding us, such as email, cell phones, texting, Facebook, Twitter and other internet services. As I wrote in a newspaper column on the topic, it is characterized by frequent interruptions of other activities, from conversations with friends to work assignments to outings with kids. Those susceptible to distracted living often feel they must tap into their communications devices, and do so reflexively, without really thinking about it. Though they believe they’re making a choice about how they use these technologies, the technologies often come to have a grip over the individual’s behavior.

OK, enough said. If you want to read more, visit my posts about the topic.